Summer 1965

Cilla_Black_(1970)Cilla Black 1943-2015

Cilla Black was an icon of the 1960’s British music phenomena. Born in Liverpool, she was a friend of the Beatles and worked at the Cavern Club. In May 2010 new research published by BBC Radio 2 showed that her version of “Anyone Who Had a Heart” was the UK’s biggest selling single by a female artist in the 1960s

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Model Jenny Boyd blonde) in photo shoot, Summer 1965

Grammar schools go comprehensive: Education Secretary Anthony Crosland’s role by Dominic Sandrbook, Daily Mail, July 29, 2015

“In July 1965, he issued his notorious Circular 10/65, using his department’s financial muscle to force local authorities to scrap their grammars and go comprehensive  ‘If it’s the last thing I do,’ he gleefully told his wife, ‘I’m going to destroy every f*****g grammar school in England.’
This was a shameful moment in our recent history. It is not just that Crosland wilfully destroyed many good schools which had worked wonders to improve the life chances of children from poor, working-class homes. It is that he saw his role as that of a petty dictator, using the power of Whitehall to trample on local objections.”
Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2894963/Why-Britain-wrecked-1965-Fifty-years-ago-UK-socially-morally-culturally-different-country-ways-better-people-far-worse.html#ixzz3hKFk8u90
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Beatles “Help” album and film are released

 

KinksSeeMyFriends-1Kinks release See My Friends

“Fifty years ago, at the height of the British Invasion, The Yardbirds released Heart Full of Soul (28 May 1965) and The Kinks, See My Friends”(30 July 1965). Both attempted to evoke something exotic, mysterious, and distinctly different from the flood of productions competing for consumer attention that summer. Drawing on Britain’s long fascination with “The Orient,” these recordings started sixties British pop down a path that proved both rewarding and problematic.”

Gordon R. Thompson is a Professor of Music at Skidmore College. His book, Please Please Me: Sixties British Pop, Inside Out, offers an insider’s view of the British pop-music recording industry. Check out Thompson’s posts on The Beatles and other music .

See more at: http://blog.oup.com/2015/07/british-invasion-orientalism-summer-1965-pop-music/#sthash.s4pLh0bv.dpuf- See more at: http://blog.oup.com/2015/07/british-invasion-orientalism-summer-1965-pop-music/#sthash.U6svM23I.dpuf

What was the weather?

August – Slightly below average temperature; near normal rainfall and sunshine.
Mean Temperature 16.6°C
Monthly Highest 25.8°C Total Rain 59 mm
Monthly Lowest 9.1°C Total Sun 188 hrs

After a fine day on the 1st, the 2nd was cool and wet. Nearly 16mm of rain fell and the temperature only reached 16°C. It then became fairly warm with plenty of dry weather. On the 12th, the temperature almost reached 26°C. Atlantic fronts brought some bands of mostly light rain, but at the end of the third week frontal systems became more active and temperature levels fell. On the last day of August a northerly wind blew and the maximum temperature was only 17°C.

Sounds of the Sixties

There was the music of course. But in addition, these are some of the sounds people associate with the 1960’s in London What sounds do you remember?

‘Penny for the Guy’ leading up to the 5th November Bonfire nights

Clink of milk bottles being delivered on your door step

“Mind the gap” announcements in the Underground

Calls of the rag and bone men

Clippity clop of the dray horses

The bells and ticket machines on the buses and the tinkling sounds of coins in the conductors’s pouch.v0_master

Factory horns announcing starting and closing times

Newspaper vendors yelling “Staaandard, get your Evening Standard here”

Air raid sirens once a week

“Clunk and clink of the record changer on the Dansette record player.maxresdefault

Children playing in the street and the occasional yell of “car!”

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“Car horns that played a little ditty.”

Picking up the phone and hearing another conversation on the trunk line

The “whoosh” of the metal container used in department stores to move money from the sales desk to the accounts department on another floor

 

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